Tip of the Iceberg

In a profession where we use shovels to unlock the secrets contained in the subsoil, the inevitable finally happened- we met our white whale.

Porter discovered the stone he found had no bottom, and Aidan chased a side of the rock to an impressive four feet of solid, glacially smoothed granite. Unfortunately for the rock, we’re not quitters. We dug to a point where we could get a chain around a promontory feature of our conquest. We employed our Toro Dingo, leverage bars and elbow grease and we got the rock to budge just a little.

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Having had it for the day, we went home with a glimmer of hope. I called the homeowner to advise her of our situation and to review our pan “A” approach as well as to get approval of plan B,C,D and E. she was delightfully amenable to our proposals, but being the thorough (some would say stubborn) professional, I was resolved to conquer the subterranean beast. Call me Ishmael.

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With a little help from our Bobcat 323 excavator, a chain, and our formerly straight Burke Bar, we caught the white whale. It’s now an interesting conversation piece as well as a sophisticated design element of the 143rd Rain Garden in the Fasoldt Gardens Portfolio.

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<p>Aidan</p></div>

Cheers, Dave Fasoldt

Recycled Motor Oil

This oil change, for the Chevy 2500hd 4×4 that we bought new in 2002 I went with a 50% recycled motor oil blend manufactured by Valvoline. Because we drive so few miles- we’re an urban landscape construction contractor, oil changes occur on the order of once a year. I paid a little more per quart than what I would typically use for this truck, but as we are primarily interested in being as organic as possible in our landscaping business, hopefully this small effort along with the other token efforts toward greening our industry will amount to some net positive effect on the pollution we humans create.

Tip of the Iceberg

In a profession where we use shovels to unlock the secrets contained in the subsoil, the inevitable finally happened- we met our white whale.

Porter discovered the stone he found had no bottom, and Aidan chased a side of the rock to an impressive four feet of solid, glacially smoothed granite. Unfortunately for the rock, we’re not quitters. We dug to a point where we could get a chain around a promontory feature of our conquest. We employed our Toro Dingo, leverage bars and elbow grease and we got the rock to budge just a little.

Having had it for the day, we went home with a glimmer of hope. I called the homeowner to advise her of our situation and to review our pan “A” approach as well as to get approval of plan B,C,D and E. she was delightfully amenable to our proposals, but being the thorough (some would say stubborn) professional, I was resolved to conquer the subterranean beast. Call me Ishmael.

With a little help from our Bobcat 323 excavator, a chain, and our formerly straight Burke Bar, we caught the white whale. It’s now an interesting conversation piece as well as a sophisticated design element of the 143rd Rain Garden in the Fasoldt Gardens Portfolio.

Cheers, Dave Fasoldt